Hill Engineering Blog

Meet our new 3D scanner

We at Hill Engineering are always looking for ways to improve the accuracy and efficiency of our laboratory. That’s why we recently acquired a 3D scanner for our laboratory, which will aid in many aspects of our residual stress measurement processes, as well as enable us to provide further services to our customers. In the newest video on our YouTube channel , we discuss some of the highlights of this tool. Continue reading Meet our new 3D scanner

Residual stress in additive manufacturing

Additive manufacturing (AM) is a manufacturing process that deposits material in a controlled manner to build three-dimensional part geometry (bit by bit). This is in contrast to traditional manufacturing processes where material is cut or removed (i.e., subtracted) from the raw stock to create the intended part shape. The potential for additive manufacturing to significantly improve the economics and performance of manufactured parts for certain applications has made it a popular topic. However, since most additive manufacturing processes are highly thermal (e.g., material is deposited in a melted form and solidifies into the desired shape) significant residual stresses can develop. Hill Engineering has been working with many collaborators to better understand the influence of these processes on residual stress. Continue reading Residual stress in additive manufacturing

Residual Stress 101

The upcoming SEM Annual Conference and Exposition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics will include a Pre-conference Course titled: Residual Stress 101. Scheduled for Sunday, June 2, 2019 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m, the residual stress short-course aims to cover a broad, practical introduction to residual stresses for interested students, researchers and industrialists. Michael Prime, Michael Hill, Adrian DeWald, Antonio Baldi, and Cev Noyan will teach the course. Registration is currently open through the SEM website. Continue reading Residual Stress 101

Propulsion Safety & Sustainment Conference 2019

Hill Engineering is presenting at the upcoming Propulsion Safety & Sustainment Conference (PS&S) in Washington, D.C. from April 23rd through April 25th. We invite you to come see us. The mission of this conference is to proactively address or prevent problems with safety, readiness, reliability, and sustainment within the tri-service turbine engine fleet. This is to be accomplished through the transition of existing and emerging technologies. Hill Engineering’s presentation will include a summary of recent work related to residual stress measurement in support of production quality control. The abstract text is presented below. <!–more–>  

Aircraft engine and structural components are being produced from forgings with increasingly complex geometries in a wide range of aerospace alloys. The forging process involves a number of steps required to attain favorable material properties (e.g., heat treatment, rapid quench, cold work stress relieving, and artificial aging). These processing steps, however, also result in the introduction of residual stress. Excessive bulk residual stresses can have negative consequences including: part distortion during machining and/or during service, reduced crack initiation life, increased crack growth rates, and an overall reduction in part life. This presentation will describe an approach for quality management of residual stresses in aerospace forgings. The quality management system relies upon computational process modeling, residual stress measurement, and the integration of these concepts within the framework of a standard production quality system.  

If you are planning to attend the conference, please stop by to discuss Hill Engineering’s capabilities in fatigue analysis and design and residual stress measurement. Please contact us for more information.  



Illustration of residual stress in an aluminum forging before and after cold work residual stress relief

Welcome Jason Barker

We would like to welcome Jason Barker to Hill Engineering. Jason has 15 years of experience as a design engineer. As a Senior Engineer for Hill Engineering, Jason’s responsibilities will include: supporting the modification of A-10 legacy product definition to Model Based Definition (MBD) effort at Hill Air Force Base, working with A-10 engineers to develop and implement best practices and policy, providing guidance to subcontractors to ensure proper Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) models are delivered to the government, and working with prime contractors to ensure a quality deliverable to the Air Force. Jason is also actively involved with implementation and management of Teamcenter Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) system within the A-10 community and supports the MBD (Model Based Definition) design effort on the A-10 Wing Replacement Program. Continue reading Welcome Jason Barker

BAMF 6.0 Release

Hill Engineering is announcing the release of version 6.0 of our Broad Application for Modeling Failure (BAMF) software. BAMF is used for fatigue analysis, and it is capable of predicting the growth of fatigue cracks in 3D parts. Starting from an assumed initial flaw, BAMF combines stress and crack growth analyses to predict the evolution of crack shape and size in 3D. Continue reading BAMF 6.0 Release