Vlog: How to Use the Nikon ModelMaker H120 3D Scanner

Hello Readers!

If you aren’t subscribed to our YouTube channel, we’d like to announce that our latest vlog is now live .

In this episode, we break down the steps to using the Nikon ModelMaker H120 3D scanner, the newest instrument in our laboratory arsenal. Engineer Ryan leads us through the demonstration, taking a simple hammer from physical part to solid model.

While his skills are impressive, it’s just a taste of the 3D scanner’s capabilities. The ModelMaker H120’s high resolution and versatility allows us to accurately capture complex geometries. If you need a part scanned, Hill Engineering is now offering services. After watching the video below, head on over to our website to contact us.

Case Study: Machine distortion modeling

We’ve recently uploaded a new case study on the topic of part distortion caused by machining. Distortion is a significant problem faced by many industries, especially where rigorous dimensional tolerances are required. When not appropriately accounted for, distortion can lead to significant economic loss and should be managed for effective design and production. Continue reading Case Study: Machine distortion modeling

Hill Engineering introduces ExpressRS

For materials engineers, designers, and managers seeking residual stress measurements, Hill Engineering is a trusted source for a broad range of best-in-class measurement capabilities. But while we always strive to deliver quality results in a timely manner, sometimes a job requires a faster than normal turn-around. This is why we’ve introduced ExpressRSTM, a service geared toward expedited delivery of residual stress measurement results. Continue reading Hill Engineering introduces ExpressRS

Case Study Highlight: 3D Scanner

Hill Engineering recently installed a Nikon ModelMaker H120 3D scanner, which is proving to be very useful in our laboratory. In addition to scanning services we now offer to outside parties, we’ve also implemented this technology into our residual stress measurement processes. This new capability allows us to produce faster, more accurate results than ever before. Continue reading Case Study Highlight: 3D Scanner

Meet our new 3D scanner

We at Hill Engineering are always looking for ways to improve the accuracy and efficiency of our laboratory. That’s why we recently acquired a 3D scanner for our laboratory, which will aid in many aspects of our residual stress measurement processes, as well as enable us to provide further services to our customers. In the newest video on our YouTube channel , we discuss some of the highlights of this tool. Continue reading Meet our new 3D scanner

Winner of the #namethataircraft Challenge: Gerold Arheilger

Everybody put your hands together for 2018’s #Namethataircraft winner, Gerold Arheilger! For those of you who were unaware, we began a bi-weekly competition this past year where our twitter followers scored points for identifying photographs of aircraft on our twitter account. Continue reading Winner of the #namethataircraft Challenge: Gerold Arheilger

Overview of a strain gage

We talk about strain gages a lot in our blogs, vlogs, and all over our website. That’s because strain gages are a crucial element of the work we do at Hill Engineering. Our little rectangular friends are very important sensors for residual stress measurements. That something so small can be so important is astounding, but how exactly do strain gages work? Continue reading Overview of a strain gage

Hole drilling residual stress measurement method

This week, we have uploaded a new vlog to Hill Engineering’s YouTube channel revolving around a particularly handy residual stress measurement technique. The hole drilling measurement method is one of our most popular residual stress measurement options, and involves the incremental drilling of a small hole into the surface of a specimen. Watch the video below and read on to learn more about the hole drilling method. Continue reading Hole drilling residual stress measurement method

Case Study: Contour Method Repeatability

Recently, Hill Engineering posted a new case study detailing our research into contour method repeatability. In the case study, we performed contour method measurements on multiple similar specimens belonging to six different specimen types: aluminum T-section, stainless steel plate with dissimilar metal slot-filled weld, stainless steel forging, titanium plate with electron beam slot-filled weld, nickel disk forging, and aluminum plate. Continue reading Case Study: Contour Method Repeatability